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GM Concept Cars

GM Concept Cars

In this first video have a look at some of the GM Concept Cars, in particular the Buick Y-Job, Cadillac LeMans and the GM LaSabre all designed by Harley Earl.
Harley revolutionized the art of car design in the 1930’s through to the 1950’s earning himself a formidable reputation.
Most concept car designs never reach the production line,  but many parts of the body styles and features like the Buick Y-Job and the Cadillac LeMans were easily recognised years later in production models as they were released.

Turbine cars were solely considered Chrysler’s territory, not so as GM
developed 3 and named them Firebirds.

Special thanks to Moto-Man for this video.

This next video is a continuation of my previous post on GM Concept cars
http://classicandcustomcarnews.com/1938-buick-y-job/
and the interview with Bob Lutz continues.
Bob discuss’ more on the GM concept cars and his involvement with them,  then his time with BMW.
This is really interesting because if you are like me you think of BMW being a very go ahead manufacturer with its finger firmly on the pulse of the auto industry,  but not so at that time.
Imagine designing a new car shaping it out of a huge log  of wood using just a chainsaw, chisels and sanders to get the desired shape. Then  cutting out the window openings.
The time involved in doing this would be horrendous.  luckily Bob was able to score a couple of truck loads of clay and introduced BMW to clay modelling.
So much easier and quicker as not only is clay easy to shape,  if you make a mistake or want to reshape an area it is simple to add a bit more clay and then reshape it.

At that time BMW sales were slack manufacturing just 180,000 cars a year, and 20,000 motor cycles.
But to be fair to the company it did suffer from the post war blues for a number of years.

Thankyou Moto-Man for this video and interview with Bob Lutz.
Photos are screen shots from these videos.
If you missed the link to the first interview here it is again.

http://classicandcustomcarnews.com/1938-buick-y-job/