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1934 Pierce-Arrow Convertible

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1934 Pierce-Arrow Convertible

1934 Pierce-Arrow Convertible V12, still original right through except for a paint job back in the ’50″s, and a recent motor overhaul.
How cool is that for a car that is 82 years old and could still be used as a daily driver if you had your own gas station.
To be fair if you could afford to buy one when new it would have been bad taste to enquire about gas mileage as the buyers of these cars were on the list of those who had made it,  and being able to afford toys like the Pierce-Arrow convertible was one of their bonus’ of success.

During the 1920’s and 30″s especially the great 3 “P‘s” of American car manufacturers – Peerless,  Pierce-Arrow and Packard – were the icons of financial success.
These breeds of cars were big, beautiful, and very expensive, and it showed.  The Brits had the same with their Rolls, Bentley and Daimler.
I have often wondered what would have happened to makes like Peerless and Pierce-Arrow had it not been for the depression as neither could survive this.
Peerless called it quits in 1931, with Pierce-Arrow closing up in 1938.  Packard struggled after WW2 for a few years before collapsing along with its then partner Studebaker.

During the prohibition days the Pierce-Arrow was a popular car with the bootleggers, its straight 6 engine developed in 1914 had hydraulic valve lifters, 4 valves per cylinder, performed very well indeed  but best of all was quiet, exceptionally so compared to most other cars.
It was ideal for sneaking in with a delivery load of the good stuff, and sneaking back out with hardly a sound.
Its V12 engine was an engineering success.  First models were 398 cub.in but these didnt perform much better than its slightly smaller V8 cousin, version 2 was 429 cub in, okay getting there.
Then came the 462 cub in, putting out 175 hp, and capable of cruising at 80 mph for long periods of time.  The Pierce-Arrow now had it all including pace.

This engine was so good that Seagrave Fire Trucks purchased the moulds and continued to make this engine for their fire trucks up till 1970.

Some interesting Pierce-Arrow history here, well worth watching.

Thankyou to Rides With Chuck for sharing this video.  Photos are video screen shots.

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